A Total TaiTai Tale

Tale of a Total TaiTai who was in Beijing & Beyond and is now in Singapore & Surroundings!

Tag: Chinese New Year

.

.

The new year doesn’t really start in Asia until we celebrate Chinese New Year so Happy Niu 牛 Year. (Every 12 years we can do this pun!)

Good Bye to the Rat and Welcome to the Ox.

And back to school for J. 🥳

from Tumblr https://ift.tt/2ZkYMEx

.

.

The bulls are finally out and ready.

Year of the Ox

D-15

from Tumblr https://ift.tt/2YwK7FP

.

.

One of the Chinese New Year celebration symptoms is a need to stop in the middle of the cross walk to take pictures. Symptoms are even more predominant at night. 😉

from Tumblr https://ift.tt/2Yp2JrA

.

.

Walking around Chinatown with a bunch of photographers is exhausting 😂

Just kidding it was great but quite a different vibe from previous year (well a LOT less crowd for sure) and trying to explain it to the newcomers is difficult.

from Tumblr https://ift.tt/3sUvJ8q

.

.

It’s officially Chinese New Year or Lunar New Year or Spring Festival

Welcome to Year 4718 and Year of the Rat

恭喜发财 – Gong Xi Fa Cai

You’ve got one more chance to start your New Year Resolutions when you live in Asia. Let do a do-over 😉

from Tumblr https://ift.tt/2TUT8HL

.

.

Gong Xi Fa Cai – May You Have a Prosperous New Year!

Wishing you all the best for the year 4717.

from Tumblr http://bit.ly/2DSDKDh

.

.

In case you didn’t know the Year of the Pig is coming… so cute little pigs are starting to pop up at every corners.

That’s the chinese calendar for those of you readers who are not familiar with Asian culture.

from Tumblr http://bit.ly/2HNIKgD

.

.

In case you didn’t know the Year of the Pig is coming… so cute little pigs are starting to pop up at every corners.

That’s the chinese calendar for those of you readers who are not familiar with Asian culture.

from Tumblr http://bit.ly/2HNIKgD

.

.

So it’s my Ben Ming Nian and I should wear red to drive away the bad lucks and evil spirits.   That’s everything I own in red… it’s going to be a long year wearing only these 🙂

“According to the Chinese astrology, the zodiac year is a year of bad luck. Most Chinese people are afraid to spend their birth sign year. Why is it unlucky? It’s said that the people during the Ben Ming Nian are easy to encounter Tai Sui who is the legendary God in charge of people’s fortune. Their fortune usually fluctuates during the year. Many bad things such as illness, financial loss, extramarital affair etc. may happen to them. Some people think it’s superstitious to believe this. In fact, it’s not completely bad for people in the zodiac year. It varies greatly from individual to individual. Some people may have good fortune instead of bad luck. But in general, marriage (nor planning on another one 😉 ), moving house (well it’s not a moving country year for us, as far as I know), travel (I’ll take my chances and/or wear more read 🙂, starting business (I guess I’ll wait another year, what’s one more!!)…are thought to be worthy of great attention during the year.”

How to Get Good Luck? : Wear Red: The Chinese people have worshiped the color red from the ancient time. They think the red are auspicious color that can protect them and drive away those bad lucks and evil spirits. Therefore, during the Ben Ming Nian, the Chinese people usually wear red including red belt, shoes, socks, insoles, clothes and underwear to pursue good fortune and avoid disaster. Also, they usually wear red ribbon which is regarded as lucky ribbon around the wrist. For some ornaments, they would rope them with silken cord and take it at any time during the year of their birth sign.

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2BBnypB

.

.

It’s the year of the dog… so it’s my 本命年 – Ben Ming Nian !!

“The Ben Ming Nian refers to the year of zodiac animal in which one was born. In China, each one has his animal sign that is determined by the lunar birth date. In all, there are twelve animal signs each undergoes a 12-year cycle. So, every twelve years, one will meet the year of his birth sign”….
Which mean I will turn either 12 y.o, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84 or 96 this year (we’ll technically between February 16, 2018 and February 4th, 2019, following the Chinese Lunar calendar). Choose wisely ;-).

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2F7pfe5