A Total TaiTai Tale

Tale of a Total TaiTai who was in Beijing & Beyond and is now in Singapore & Surroundings!

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One last stop on our way back to Margaret River was at Injidup Beach in Yallingup and the Injidup Natural Spa which is a large natural rock pool.

We were there at rising tide so the waves were really impressive on the beach and also rolling into the natural pool which made the water in the natural rock formation not as translucent as it would be in calmer time. Beautiful nonetheless and quite impressive.

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Another stop was made at the Canal Rocks

First picture is a panorama while standing on one side of the formation, the second picture is from the road a little bit further south.

The rock formation takes its name from the narrow channel between the rocks that has formed from the coastal waters eroding the granite-gneiss away over time.

Pounding waves off the Indian Ocean have sculptured a network of canals into this headland, forming a patchwork of rocky islands. The unusual pattern of coastal erosion is controlled by an intersecting system of joints, fractures and fault within the gneiss. It allows the water to deeply penetrate the rocks eroding it to form linear-shaped canals

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Another quick stop by the beach to briefly dip our toes in the ocean.

The tshirt said Brigands des Mers in French (Brigands of the seas) which I thought was funny and I had to take a picture 😉

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After a drive to the south, we drove to the north of Margaret River.

Cape Naturaliste lighthouse is not as impressive in size as Leeuwin Lighthouse but was the last on mainland Australia to be home to lighthouse keepers who lived and worked here until 1996.

It was build in 1903 and stands on a 100 metre bluff overlooking the Geographe Bay. The light’s white beam is visible for 25 nautical miles (46km) and identifies itself to mariners by flashing twice every 10 seconds with 2.5 and 7.5 second interval.

The original Fresnel lens is still in place and is now driven by an electric motor but originally the clockwork mechanism rotated the lens which, including the turntable, weights about 12.5 tons. The turntable is hollow and contains 156.5 kg (or 12 litres) of mercury on which the lens float.

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