A Total TaiTai Tale

Tale of a Total TaiTai who was in Beijing & Beyond and is now in Singapore & Surroundings!

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Another beautiful day spend on the boat chasing creature on land and in the sea.

You get a lot of reading done in real life when you aren’t distracted by online life.

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It’s time to say goodbye… kiss kiss until next time Komodo.

Another great souvenir and amazing experience to see them with our own eyes.

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While we saw quite a few in the wild while walking around, they camouflage themselves so well that they are hard to photograph (especially with an iPhone!) so here’s another poser 😉

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She was going to be front and center or she wasn’t going to pose.

Well go for it.

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Let’s go see more… Entering Komodo dragons territory on the island with their name on it.

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Family portrait and a panorama view of the beauty.

You can see our boat in the ocean on the right hand side.

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On our way to another island to spot more dragons we stopped at Padar island.

Located between Rinca island and Komodo Island, Padar is the third largest island part of the Komodo National Park. It’s a trekking destination with breathtaking view of beautiful pristine beaches in different colors.

Not entirely easy to see from this picture but they are 3 beach with 3 different sand colors: white sand on the right, black sand on the bottom left and pink sand on the top left

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Some other fun facts about Komodo dragons.

Female Komodo dragons can reproduce asexually through a process called parthenogenesis. When no males are present, females can still lay a viable clutch of eggs.

It may be amazing that female Komodo dragons can make sure the species continues with or without the presence of males. But something that isn’t quite so inspiring is that those little offspring might just be an easy meal. For this reason, young Komodo dragons will spend time up in trees, avoiding getting in the path of larger lizards. That’s not the only behavior that helps keep them alive to adulthood. “Because large Komodos cannibalize young ones, the young often roll in fecal material, thereby assuming a scent that the large dragons are programmed to avoid

#MotherhoodItsNotAlwaysEasy

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We walked by this one and didn’t noticed it until our guide pointed it to us.

To catch their prey, they use an ambush strategy. Matching well with the dirt surroundings of their island home, they lie in wait for an unsuspecting animal to pass by. They then sprint into action, landing a venomous bite before the victim can escape.

Komodo dragon is one of the few venomous lizards on the planet. The dragon’s venom rapidly decreases blood pressure, expedites blood loss, and sends a victim into shock, rendering it too weak to fight. Unlike a snake, however, which injects venom into a victim through its sharp fangs, a Komodo dragon’s venom seeps into large wounds it makes on whatever unlucky animal it attacks. The animal may escape the grip of the dragon, but it won’t escape the venom that will eventually bring it down. By then, the Komodo dragon will be not far behind, tracking down its fleeing victim with its keen sense of smell.

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The Komodo dragon itself showed us that they are dangerous.

A member of the monitor lizard family Varanidae, it is the largest extant species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 metres (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

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